Mythe & Lejend: Magic System Update

Mythe & Lejend: Magic System Update

A while back I made a post about the magic system I’m developing for my tabletop role playing game, Mythe & Lejend. View it here!

Well… I recently found a flaw in my magic system. Depending on how you decide to look at it.

If you look at my magic system, while it isn’t easy to understand at first, it does turn out to be fairly simple in the end. The problem I found is it cuts out a major part of the magic system.

Enchantment spells.
By enchantment I don’t mean spells that make items better such as making that +1 Broadsword of Misogyny.
What I do mean is spells that compel or charm a creature into doing something, improving or worsening their attitude about something, or even just straight up mind control.
I also found that Divination spells are very hard to make.

It seemed that while I had a system that I understood and could build spells in willy nilly, I also had a system that could not do what was intended.
It was intended to recreate any spell that a user could imagine in some form, or at least all of the spells in traditional tabletop role playing games.

I’m making a change on the system in a few ways. While I haven’t fully worked out the bugs on it, I have decided to change the “Actions” portion of spellcasting into a choice between “Schools of Magic”.

I honestly don’t know why I didn’t think of it before. While this simplifies your understanding of where a spell falls, as long as you understand what each school does, it also makes the chart much larger.
For Example:
Schools of Magic
Abjuration
Protection (Magic shields, armor, or types of defensive spells.)
Negation (Anti-Magic spells.)
Warding (Glyphs, or spells that have a specific activation.)
Conjuration 
Calling (Transport items, or creatures from other planes to you for a time.)
Summoning (Transport items, or creatures from the physical plane to you.)
Transportation (Transport items, or creatures to a different place.)
Creation (Create items of magical or non-magical means.)
Divination
Past (View events that have happened)
Present (View events that are happening)
Future (View events that will happen)
Identification (Identify magic items, spells, and creatures)
Enchantment
Compulsion (Mind-Affecting)
Charm (Emotional)
Evocation
Offensive (Damaging)
Invocation (Non-Damaging)
Illusion
Figment (Small sensations of touch or sound)
Glamer (Changes how something appears to the target.)
Pattern (Insubstantial images that daze/confuse/blind/hurt the target.)
Phantasm (Creates hallucinations that can hurt the target)
Shadow (This creates physical images out of shadows that can affect the target.)
Necromancy
Recovery (Healing)
Inflicting (Curses and Wounding)
Animation (Allows you to do anything that deal with undead. Create/disrupt/etc. Does not allow resurrection.)
Transmutation
Alteration (This allows you to change something physically. Objects/Creatures/Elements of nature)
Enhancement (This is a non physical change. It just gives you a boost to a trait.)

Those are the schools and the appropriate subschools. Looking into D&D spells each one is labeled within its school and the description can send you into the subschool. Some spells do fall into the wrong category in my opinion.

The “Open/Close” spell is a transmutation spell. That is strange to me as I would put it into the Evocation – Invocation category.
“Mage Armor” is listed as a Conjuration-Creation spell in D&D. I definitely see it more along the lines of Abjuration-Protection.
“Obscuring Mist” is listed as Conjuration-Creation. This is up in the air, because I can understand that but I would probably put it as a Transmutation-Alteration or an Evocation-Invocation. This is where the lines start to get blurry.

There a ton of spells that could be argued into other schools, but really the thing that makes your spell fit into any school is how you came to make your spell work.
With “Obscuring Mist” as an example.
It definitely could be a Conjuration-Creation spell because you are creating a fog to put around you. Though it could be Transmutation-Alteration as you are altering the state that the moisture in the air is in by turning it into a fog. Also could be Evocation-Invocation as you are invoking the spirits of water to turn the moisture into fog. (Evocation is a weird school of magic)[Magic is just weird in general]

Either way you accomplish the spell, some with higher or lower costs, and the DM can choose what benefit each spell could add. Maybe the place your in is dry and therefore there is no moisture to draw upon. So you would have to create water or moisture to use it.

The big thing I wanted to do with this roleplaying system, especially the magic system, is create a sort of pseudo-science within magic. Allowing people to create and build spells like an actual wizard. Giving them this sense of cleverness or intelligence for having this creative freedom. Otherwise a person could pre-make spells, or look up spells and write them down to make their own sort of spell books full of spell combinations and what they do.

Wouldn’t that just be great? It makes me happy to think players coming to a game with their own sort of “Spellbook” full of spell combinations and point values.
That is one thing that drives me to keep making this.

Anyway, that’s all the update I have now. I’ll update more as I balance the system out by adding numbers, changing the way you create, and such.

Thanks for reading!
Aaron

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Orenda – Magic System – Mythe and Lejend

Orenda – Magic System – Mythe and Lejend

Okay, be warned. This contains math.

So in my system I wanted to create a freestyle magic system. You come up with the spell, you choose from the choices in the system the best choices that describe what your spell is, and then spend the allotted amount of points to cast your spell. Continue reading “Orenda – Magic System – Mythe and Lejend”

All about Class – Mythe & Lejend RPG

All about Class – Mythe & Lejend RPG

Mythe & Lejend is the new Tabletop RPG I’ve been developing in my spare time.
It takes a lot of inspiration from several of the different games, video or tabletop, that I’ve played over the years.
One of the big inspirations was the class system. Looking at systems that offer multiple class options and have you follow down a path to become the best that class has to offer is great. Most people pick and choose as they do this and this is where you end up having people multi-classing, min-maxing, and just tweaking their character out of the set boundaries. I myself am not a big fan of people that prefer to maximize their character’s output levels by finding every little ‘flaw’ in a system to make their character the absolute best.

My system seems to play for these people, and it does, because I know they are out there and they want new systems to ‘break’ and build in. With my system you can find the ways to make your character seem the absolute best in everything you want him to do by cross-classing and mixing it up. Though it allows the freedom to do it, you are also rewarded for following a more defined path in the system. Offering better abilities as you unlock new tiers and boosting your characters power as you go through the levels.

Okay, enough of me explaining, how about I just get to the part with class?

So there are 6 main ‘classes’ in M&L.

There are three ‘Roles’ and three ‘Focuses’ in the game. I split these not necessarily because the are different things, but because they represent different options in the game.

The ‘Roles’ are:

  • Combat
  • Support
  • Utility

Roles represent, well, the role you would play in the game. Combat is obviously combat oriented. Utility is geared more towards talent (Or in D&D/Pathfinder Skills) based encounters. Support floats between combat and talents with it’s own strengths.

The ‘Focuses’ are:

  • Magic
  • Skill
  • Tech

Focuses represent the tool you use to accomplish your objectives. Magic is obvious, being someone who dabbles in the flow of the universe to achieve his goal. Tech uses the scattered bits of technology to it’s advantage, being anything from hacking to engineering. Skill uses their expertise in a particular area of combat or talents. This mostly translates to your more rogue or monk type classes.

Each Role and Focus has 3 available, what I’m currently calling, ‘Blips’ for you to place points in.

Blips work in a tier system. You start off with one at first level and gain one again at 4th, 8th, 12th, 16th, and 20th. This will give you 6 blips to assign at the highest level. With that you could possibly have a maxed out role and focus, two maxed focuses or roles, 3 options with 2 blips in them, 1 point in each option, and so on and so forth.

Now what happens when you put a blip into a class option?
Well, you unlock the next tier of abilities associated with that class and if it’s your first you gain an associated class perk.

I’m still working on the abilities and separating them into the different classes tiers, and the perks are also still a work in progress.

What I have so far though is this.

For putting 1 blip into these classes you gain the following perk options:
Combat – Forms. These are passive abilities that improve your ability in combat with certain types of weapons or certain types of attacks. (Ex. A melee form would give a certain bonus to attacks with melee weapons, while ranged forms would do the same with certain types of ranged weapons.)
Support – Tactician. This is an ability to boost your allies talents or skill in or out of combat as you issue them directions or make battle plans. (Ex. A Support character issues a direction for another character to attack an certain enemy. That character would gain a bonus on any attacks towards that enemy.)
Utility – Tools. (This one is up in the air currently.) This pretty much gives you access to a tool bonus on talents that you don’t have tools for. The idea is that you are just kind of making it up as you go and enduring everything that gets thrown at you along the way. (As I said, I’m still thinking on this one.)
Magic – Orenda. You gain a pool of magical energy that allows you to cast spells as seen on the Spellcraft table. (Get to this later. Just think of it as Mana.)
Skill – Nerve. You gain a pool of energy that allows you to perform feats that would be difficult for most people, but you make look easy.
Tech – Creativity. You gain a pool of energy that allows you to build, create, or repair technology on the fly or over time. (Think Macgyver-ish.)

That’s so far there. I’m partly done with the magic system and will be posting it a little later, but here is the class system in all of it’s pre-alpha glory.

That’s all I have on that so far.

Cheers,

Aaron.

Mythe & Lejend Role Playing Game

Mythe & Lejend Role Playing Game

Okay, so I had a big post about my birthday coming up and it reminded me that I have forgotten to speak about my new project!
“Oh great, another project for you to work on instead of the thousands of other things you’ve come up with.”
Well… Okay! Yes, I’ve been working on this instead of Brothers Three or Ameliorate or even my map!
To be serious, developing this system has been a cooperative effort to go along with my books and my world.

The development of this system is so far helping me understand how things work in the world I am building.

Here is how. Continue reading “Mythe & Lejend Role Playing Game”